Category Archives: Business Analysis

Excel 2016 – Chronicles Vol. II

For many people saying thank you carries more weight then a big celebration of accomplishment or award. It’s the little things that matter.  Excel 2016 has many of those little things.  Slight differences which go unnoticed by most but add tremendous value.  One of the little things added to Excel 2016 is ability to add to completely independent windows.  In  the past windows could be created but they both were controlled by the same ribbon.  This limited the flexibility in both windows.  For example you always had to keep in mind which window was active to preform operations.  The small change into two completely independent windows makes it easier to work with multiple monitor setups.  Here’s a quick run through on how to create windows in Excel 2016.

1.Under the Ribbon click View

Excel 2016 Ribbon

2.Under View select New Window

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3. Two independent windows appear. Notice two separate Ribbons.

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It is important to note that even though the same Excel workbook is separated in two windows communication between them still exists. This is a small change in the users eyes but a powerful one.

 

Subtotal Function

If you’ve been in any of our classes you know we love to share shortcuts.  The shortcuts can be keyboard shortcuts or anything that will help our attendees do things quicker.  Here we talk about the subtotal function (not to be confused with subtotal tool).  This function will help quickly aggregate only visible rows if some rows are hidden.

Never Update the Pivot Table Source Range Again

Pivot tables are one of the most helpful tools in Microsoft Excel.  I literally use it everyday for the various projects I work on.  One of the crucial steps when working with a Pivot Table is to update your source range.  Updating a source range is needed when new data is added.  This is an easy step to forget when you are working on multiple time sensitive projects.  There are two ways to get around this issue.  The first technique is to transform the source range into a table.  A table is a way to tag a group of cells in Excel.  To change a group of rows and columns to a table do the following:

Range

 

Range2

1. Click Insert

2. Click Table

Select Table Range3. Specify the data range of the table

4. Click Ok

Range to Table

5. The source range has been transformed into an official Excel table

The next step would be to create a pivot table and specify the table range.  Excel will automatically recognize that this is a special “table”.  Now any additional rows or columns  you add to the table will be automatically carried to the pivot table.  All you have to do is refresh the pivot table.  Tables are handy tools which have other benefits as well.  We will share another approach on how to automatically update a source range in our upcoming class. Register here.

 

 

 

 

Excel in Financial Planning and Forecasting

Recently I read this articled titled Excel in Financial Planning and Forecasting: The old same problem for CFOs.  This was a great post which summarized the wide spread usage of Microsoft Excel in the area of financial planning and forecasting. In short, “43% of respondents use Microsoft Excel for financial planning and budgeting”. According to the article In spite of the high usage of Excel many survey respondents had some concerns about using this tool.   Amongst the concerns were:

  • Inability to preform what-if Scenarios
  • Inflexibility of Excel
  • Not friendly to users
  • Lack of skilled staff to perform the task

Many of the highlighted reasons stem from the limited Microsoft Excel expertise available in many organization.  Skilled staff should be able to create a financial model that solve the concerns above.  A financial model can be built to handle the planning and forecasting process in a seamless way.  What is a financial model?  Think of a model train.  The train model looks like a real train but may not have all of the components.  It resembles the real life version in some form or another.  A financial model is used to  forecast the impact on an organizations finances based on “what-if” scenarios.  Internal or external changes can be entered into the model to review the change on a business. The purpose of a financial model is to paint a financial picture, test various scenarios and support fact based decisions.  If this tool is built properly it can alleviate all of the concerns highlighted in the article above.  

In order to build a sound financial model a few things should be kept in mind.  The models that we have built in the past for institutions are the result of a through fact gathering process.  The process includes multiple discussions with key personnel, research on the specific industry and review of prior financial statements to name a few. As a result the models are more accurate, flexible and provide information quickly.  In order to build a good financial model below are  a few things which should be kept in mind: 

Build Ability to Test What-If Scenarios

Utilize tools in Excel like drop-downs and links to create the ability to test scenarios dynamically.

Design with Environment in Mind

In order to design with the environment in mind research the industry and key trends.  Include this information in the model.

Design with User in Mind

This is a key part of any software design.  Interview key stakeholders.  Who will be using the model? Who do they report to?  What type of information will they need to produce?  What types of ad-hoc request did they receive in the past?  What is the proficiency level of the primary user with Excel?  The answers to these questions and others will help in the design of a tool that is easy to use.

Outsource Design & Internalize Knowledge

Many organization lack the skilled staff to build such a tool.  In many cases it is ideal to outsource the development of the tool but internalize the knowledge associated with it.  For example, often after we develop a tool for an organization we provide training and documentation.  After this point key personnel are able to modify the financial model as the business changes or products\services are added.

Microsoft Excel has become the software of choice for planning and forecasting primarily due to its flexibility.  This same reason is a source of concern for many organizations which lack the skilled staff.  Outsourcing the design of a financial model can increase accuracy and speed up the planning and forecasting process.

 

 

Understanding Your Small Business Revenue

Over the past few weeks I’ve been attending FastTrac Growth Venture©.  This is a entrepreneurship program designed by the Kauffman Foundation to help revenue generating small businesses grow to the next level.  During one of the sessions each business owner took some time to dive into there revenue patterns.  Understanding revenue patterns is a critical piece of every business.  A good understanding of this line item can help business owners plan for cyclical slowdowns, identify high volume customers or lucrative products\services. Below are a few things you can implement in your business right away to begin to understand the revenue numbers:

Create a Cash Flow Analysis – Cash flow is the movement of money in and out of your business. Analyzing your cash flow can help you plan for late paying customers and slow seasons.  Analyzing your cash flow in advanced can help your business stay away from costly stop gap measures like a line of credit. An analysis tool can be created in a tool like Excel or by utilizing a stand-alone package like Quickbooks.

Create Revenue Slices – There are different ways to cut your revenue to discern patterns.  For example as a small business owner you can cut your revenue by client demographics, product\service type or  various time horizons to name a few.  Each slice tells a different perspective, together they tell a story about your businesses revenue.  These slices can be setup with a simple table in Excel.  The addition of trend visualization tools like sparklines can assist with identifying revenue patterns.  

Every business owner should understand the numbers, especially the revenue numbers.  In addition business owners should develop a plan to measure and provoke growth.  With the help of some of the techniques highlighted here small business owners can soar to new heights in revenue.

Small Business Break-even Point

Break-even Point

 

One bit of information every business owner and start up should know is there break-even point.  The break-even point is the juncture at which revenue is equal to expenses.  This information helps business owners understand the number of units they need to sell in order to cover expenses. In the example above we arrive at the break even point by dividing the total fixed expenses of $1,000 by the per unit price which is $20.  The result of 50 represents the number of units which need to be sold in order to break even.